Kate is a multi-document editor part of KDE since release 2.2. Being a KDE application, Kate ships with network transparency, as well as integration with the outstanding features of KDE. Choose it for viewing HTML sources from konqueror, editing configuration files, writing new applications or any other text editing task. You still need just one running instance of Kate. Learn more...

Screenshot of kate showing multiple documents and the building terminal emulator

Kate LSP Client Progress

The Kate lsp branch contains now the infrastructure as used by Qt Creator. In addition, clangd is now somehow started in a working state for the first project opened inside Kate. For example, if you use the CMake Kate project generator and you compile Kate from the “lsp” branch, clangd should pick up the compile_commands.json for a CMake generated Kate project. ;=) Unfortunately not much more than starting and informing clangd about the open workspaces (for the first opened project) works ATM. [Read More]

Kate Language Server Protocol Client

The Language Server Protocol (LSP) allows the integration of stuff like code completion, jump to definition, symbol search and more into an application without manual re-implementation for each language one wants to support. LSP doesn’t fully allow an integration like KDevelop or Qt Creator do with the libclang based tooling aimed for C/C++ but on the other side offers the possibility to interface with plenty of languages without a large effort on the client side. [Read More]

Qt Creator 4.9 uses KSyntaxHighlighting

As you can read in the official Creator 4.9.0 release announcement, Qt Creator now uses the KSyntaxHighlighting Framework for providing the generic highlighting. This is a nice step for the wider adoption of this MIT licensed part of the KDE Frameworks. And this is not just an one-way consumption of our work. The framework got actively patches back that make it more usable for other consumers, too, like Kate ;=) [Read More]

Removing Files from Git History

Today I did run again into an old problem: You need to archive a lot small and large files inside a single Git repository and you have no support for Git LFS available. You did this several year and now you ended up in a state where cloning and working with the repository is unbearable slow. What now? Last time I did run into that, I archived the overfull repository to some “rest in peace” space and used git filter-branch to filter out no longer needed and too large objects from a repository copy that then will replace the old one for daily use. [Read More]

Kate History – KDE 4 Porting

During my web site upgrade, I reviewed the old stuff I had hosted on my long gone web sites but still archived here locally. An interesting thing I stumbled on are the KDE 3 -> 4 porting screenshots of Kate I saved in 2005. They actually show pretty nicely how far we have gone since 2005 with our development stack. The KDE 3 -> 4 transition was a large hassle. It did take weeks of work just to get Kate back into an usable state. [Read More]

Web-Server Transition

Several years the kate-editor.org & cullmann.io pages got hosted on a Hetzner root server. To reduce costs and switch away from old hardware they got now moved to a OpenVZ based virtual server at Host Europe. On both servers CentOS 7.x is running, it did always provide a stable foundation of the web services. As with any server move in the past, I always need to search how to best move the data/config from one server to the other. [Read More]

Privacy and Hugo Themes

I use the “Hugo Coder” theme for this page. After creating the privacy page (Impressum), I did take a closer look at the generated HTML code to confirm I didn’t miss to state things there. I thought, given Hugo generates plain static HTML pages, I would be on the safe side. But unfortunately, the theme I use includes some external resources, like the Google web fonts… I now patched that out in my fork of the theme and provide local copies on my own server. [Read More]

Hugo Extended on CentOS 7

After first using the Hermit theme, I moved to the Hugo Coder theme to have a nicer front page and menu at the top. Unfortunately that needs Hugo in the “extended” version. The binary one can download on https://github.com/gohugoio/hugo/releases doesn’t run on CentOS 7, unlike the normal variant you get there (too new libstdc++ needed). One has to recompile it to get that working. To make it easier for others, to do so, just:

New Website

After several years of failing to update my personal WordPress page, I restarted my website with the Hugo framework. The new website uses zero cookies (yes, no stupid cookie question) and no kind of analytic software. I hope my Impressum is done well enough to avoid any legal issues. At the moment the website is still very empty, I hope to fill in more content about my open source projects and academic stuff in the near future. [Read More]

MIT licensed KSyntaxHighlighting usage

With the KDE Frameworks 5.50 release, the KSyntaxHighlighting framework was re-licensed to the MIT license. This re-licensing only covers the actual code in the library and the bundled themes but not all of the syntax highlighting definition data files. One of the main motivation points was to get QtCreator to use this, if possible, instead of their own implementation of the Kate highlighting they needed to create in the past due to the incompatible licensing of KatePart at that time (and the impossibility to do a quick split/re-licensing of the parts in question). [Read More]