All posts by Dominik

Dominik is a PhD student at the Control Theory and Robotics Lab, TU Darmstadt, as part of the Research Training Group GKMM (GRK1362). My research focuses on state estimation in distributed systems. As hobby, I contribute to the KDE project and work on the Kate application and editor component.

Kate 16.04 on Windows (64bit)

It seems the Kate Alpha Release in January was well received by some users. So we are happy to announce that we are releasing an updated Windows installer for Kate (64bit) today. Essentially, this is the same version that is shipped with the KDE Applications 16.04 release under Linux.

  • Kate-setup-16.04.1-64bit.exe (64bit) installer, compiled on Windows 10
  • If you have git in your PATH, then the Kate Projects plugin will work as expected.
  • As mentioned in the previous post, you may want to also install D-Bus for Windows, so that all documents opened use the same Kate instance.
  • You can compile Kate yourself with Visual Studio 2015 community edition by following the steps in kate-windows.git. For me, a few tweaks were necessary, though: If some modules do not compile, just run the cmake build command again (and again). The “NMake Makefiles JOM” do not work for me, I had to use “Visual Studio 14 2015 Win64” generator. You can start the Visual Studio with `devenv KateOnWindows.sln`. If you have further questions, please contact us on the mailing list.

Screenshot of running Kate under Windows 10:

Kate on Windows 10If you want to contribute or have questions, please contact the Kate developers on kwrite-devel@kde.org (subscribe). Also, you can sometimes reach us via IRC on irc.freenode.net in the channel #kate.

Further, if you want to support Kate and the KDE project in general, it is very much appreciated if you donate to the KDE e.V., KDE’s support organization – thank you! 🙂

Kate/KDevelop 2015

From the 7th to the 11th of October Kate and KDevelop contricutors once again met to work on both Kate and KDevelop.

The work in Kate was mostly spent on fixing bugs, as can be seen by the following bug chart for Kate:

Kate Bug Charts

That is, more than 300 bug and wish reports were closed. Granted, many of the reports were just old and given our limited manpower we were closing many wishes since it is unlikely that old wishes get implemented. Then again, we also fixed a lot of bugs that required code changes, and also fine tuning of KTextEditor and Kate. The fixed bugs are roughly KDE bug tracker (yes, the auto-brackets option is back!), besides there are also a lot of changes there were not listed in bug reports. We hope the changes are useful to you, so be sure to get the KDE Frameworks version 5.16 as soon as it’s released 🙂

Again about Relicensing KDE’s Source Code

To get started with KDE development, newcomers usually first sent patches. Having sent several patches, the newcomers are typically encouraged by us (the reviewers) to apply for a KDE contributor account. This application includes the question of “who encouraged you to apply for a KDE contributor account”.

Then, the KDE sysadmins contact the mentioned developers to make sure the application is valid and trustworthy.  Hence, you, as someone who encouraged others to apply for an account, get a mail with the subject “Developer account application approval […]”.

To all KDE contributors: Given you probably also were involved with getting other contributors involved with KDE, please follow these steps:

  1. Filter your KDE mails for “Developer account application approval”
  2. For each contributor, get the contributors commit name (you can look this up on identity.kde.org > Prople.
  3. Check, whether the new contributor added him/herself to the relicensecheck.pl script.
  4. If not, please send this contributor a mail and encourage him/her to add him/herself to this script.

You really should check this, since you are also responsible for getting these new contributors commit access.

I did that with 8 contributors. 7 already added themselves within one week. Only one is not reachable by mail anymore… So it seems to work quite well.