On-the-fly spellchecking in Kate

Christoph just added an awesome and long awaited feature: on-the-fly spellchecking. ‘Kate’s xml highlighting files now have an additional attribute in the itemData section: spellChecking=”true/false”. C++ comments and strings can be spellchecked now :) Same for all other languages such as Latex. Really big thanks to Michel Ludwig for the patch, good work! Screenshot for latex highlighting:

Kate Test Regression Suite

This blog is mainly about documenting the process how to run Kate Part’s test regression suite and probably not much use for other developers.

Step I: Setup the environment

  1. create the file ~/.testkateregression. The content of this file is a single line pointing to the folder of the checkout of the test regression suite data. For me this is
    /home/dh/kde/tests/katetests/regression/
  2. Create the folder where you checkout the suite
    mkdir /home/dh/kde/tests
  3. Change to this folder
  4. Checkout the data:
    svn co svn://anonsvn.kde.org/home/kde/trunk/tests/katetests

Now all the data is there for testing.

Step II: Run the test suite

  1. go to your build directory of kate (e.g. kdelibs/build/kate/tests/
  2. run the complete suite:
    ./testkateregression.shell
  3. run specific tests, e.g. for the c indenter:
    ./testkateregression.shell -t indent/csmart

That’s it.

Kate linter plugin

Just a quicky: I wrote a little plugin for KTextEditor which supplies you with basic error checking when you save documents. Currently only PHP (via php -l) and JavaScript (via JavaScript Lint) are supported.

Screenshots
Requirements
  • usual tools for compiling C++, e.g. gcc.
  • cmake
  • Qt development packages, i.e. under Ubuntu: sudo aptitude install libqt4-dev
  • KDE 4.2 with development packages for kdelibs and kdebase, i.e. under Ubuntu: sudo aptitude install kdebase-dev kdebase-workspace-dev kdelibs5-dev. Note: You’ll need the experimental KDE 4.2 packages activated as of now, see for example the Kubuntu news on KDE 4.2 RC1 for hints.
  • proper setup of environment variables, read this techbase article for more information. the .bashrc linked there should be enough for most people
  • For PHP support: a PHP executable which supports the -l switch for linting
  • For JavaScript support: a JavaScript Lint executable, you could download and compile the sources for example.
Installing

Get the sources for the linter plugin from KDE SVN and compile it, using e.g. the functions supplied via the .bashrc mentioned above:

  1. # go to your development folder
  2. cs
  3. # checkout sources
  4. svn co svn://anonsvn.kde.org/home/kde/trunk/playground/devtools/kte_linter
  5. cd kte_linter
  6. # build base linter plugin
  7. cd linter
  8. cmakekde
  9. # build php linter plugin
  10. cd ../phplinter
  11. cmakekde
  12. # build javascript linter plugin
  13. cd ../jslinter
  14. cmakekde
  15. # update sycoca
  16. kbuildsycoca4
  17. # start editor and select the plugins - happy coding!
  18. kwrite
Todo
  • Support for more languages

    If you know good linters drop me a note. But it would be even better if you could write your own linter plugin. It’s pretty easy, take a look at one of the existing plugins for a skeleton & documentation.

  • Right now each plugin returns a hardcoded list of highlighting-modes which it supports for linting. This should be made configurable so that custom highlighting modes are supported

  • make error messages more pretty

Happy coding!

System Load Viewer

Last year I’ve blogged about the missing system monitor with the three bars for the panel and about its port to Plasma. Meanwhile other developers also did a port called System Status. In a collaboration with them we finally have the applet back in KDE’s subversion, the name is now “System Load Viewer” and it uses the data engine “systemmonitor” that already exists in KDE 4.2.
So if you want to have the plasmoid for your KDE4.2 desktop, it should be straightforward to compile/install.
On the screenshot you can see the plasmoid in action. There are two instances, one on the panel and one on the desktop. The one on the left is the KDE3 one.

It’s worth to mention that the plasmoid already supports more featues than the KDE3 version. Features include:

  • show all cpus (for computers with multicores)
  • tooltip updates continuously
  • nicer visualization (maybe needs some more tweaks)

As soon as the KDE 4.2 freeze is over we’ll have to see where we can put the plasmoid to make sure it’s available for KDE 4.3 :)