Category Archives: Developers

Disable Line Modification Indicators

On KDE 4.8.0, there is no way to disable the line modification markers.

In KDE >= 4.8.1, you can disable them as follows by first closing Kate and then typing

kwriteconfig --file katerc --group "Kate View Defaults" --key "Line Modification" --type bool false

To enable it again, close Kate and run

kwriteconfig --file katerc --group "Kate View Defaults" --key "Line Modification" --type bool true

However, this only affects Kate; not KWrite, Kile, KDevelop or any other application using Kate Part. If you want to disable the markers for KWrite, Kile or KDevelop, use kwriterc, kilerc or kdeveloprc instead of katerc.

In KDE >= 4.9, there is a graphical option in the editor configuration dialog in “Appearance > Borders > [x] Show line modification markers”.


Scripting in Kate

Since several releases, Kate Part has scripting support through javascript. So far, it seems it is not much used by users. Still, I stumbled over two extensions:

If you have more user defined scripts, it would be nice if you let us know! For KDE5, we plan to extend this, so applications like Kile or KDevelop can reuse Kate’s internal code.

On another note, here is a nice blog about the upcoming KDE 4.8 release :-)

One great man less :(

Dennis MacAlistair Ritchie died at home this weekend.

Dennis MacAlistair Ritchie

As the creator of the C programming language and one of the main developers of Unix, he impacted the life of me and other developers a lot.

Even today, 30 years after their initial creation, many people work on Unix like systems (like Linux or Mac OS) and develop in (Objective) C(++).

For me C was one of my starting languages for my real programming work and even today I analyze the whole day software written in C for embedded systems that control our modern world, be it the flight control of airplanes or engine control of cars.

Without his initial ideas and work, today there would be no Linux kernel, no Mac OS, …

We all owe him a lot. He changed the world.

Thanks for your great inventions! You won’t be forgotten.

Just two impressive Ritchie cites:

“Unix is simple and coherent, but it takes a genius – or at any rate a programmer – to understand and appreciate the simplicity.”

“The greatest danger to good computer science research today may be excessive relevance. If we can keep alive enough openess to new ideas, enough freedom of communication, enough patience to allow the novel to prosper, it will remain possible for a future Ken Thompson to find a little-used Cray/1 computer and fashion a system as creative, and as influential, as Unix.”